About the Project
 
:: Project Protocols
:: IPANE Project Team
:: IPANE Advisory Committee
:: New England Invasive Plant Summit
:: Acknowledgements

About the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England project

The Invasive Plant Atlas of New England is a multi-faceted project designed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date information about invasive plants in New England. The goals of the project are to facilitate education and research leading to a greater understanding of the dynamics of plant invasions, and to support the early detection of new invasions, which will enable rapid management responses.

The project includes a web-accessible atlas with images and descriptive information for the invasive and potentially invasive plants in New England. Collection databases constructed from herbarium specimens and current field records document the dates and locations of invasive plant occurrences, making it possible to generate maps that depict the distribution and spread of invasive plants across New England. The intent is to provide public access to an online interactive resource that can act as an effective tool for students, researchers, land managers, conservationists, scientists, government agencies, the green industry, and the interested public.

The project is actively creating a network of trained volunteers who inventory habitats throughout New England for the presence and absence of invasive plant species. The data collected by our professionals and volunteers is used to continually update the collection databases, and plays a central role in our goals of academic research and early detection.

The project is supported by a grant from the USDA. Partners involved in the project include: the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department of the University of Connecticut, the University of Connecticut Libraries, the University of Connecticut Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, the Silvio O. Conte Refuge of the U.S. Fish & Wild life Service, and the New England Wildflower Society.

For additional information please contact: Dr. Les Mehrhoff, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut at les.mehrhoff@uconn.edu or (860) 486-5708.