COMMON NAME

Porcelainberry
Amur peppervine


FULL SCIENTIFIC NAME

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim.) Trautv.


FAMILY NAME COMMON

Grape family


FAMILY SCIENTIFIC NAME

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata


IMAGES


Incursion

Close-up of fruit

Habit

Flowers

Bark close-up

Seedlings

NOMENCLATURE/SYNONYMS

Synonyms: Ampelopsis heterophylla (Thunb.) Sieb. & Zucc.
Ampelopsis brevipedunculata var. maximowiczii (Regel) Rehd. (a variety that is just as invasive with deeper lobes).


DESCRIPTION

Botanical Glossary

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is a tendril-bearing perennial vine that can grow 3-6 m (10-20 ft.) high or more. The alternate leaves are cordate-ovate and are 5-10 cm (2-4 in.) across. The young twigs, petioles and the undersides of the leaves are hairy. The leaves are slightly 3-lobed, sometimes 5-lobed and can be cleft. They are short-acuminate and crenate-dentate with apiculate points. The green flowers, arranged in cymes, are dense and small and appear in July-August. The fruit appear in September are spherical and 6-8 mm (0.25-0.3 in.) in size. They are hard berries that can vary in color from yellow to lilac to green, and most often end up a sky blue. These berries can be marbled and a variety of colors can be found in one cluster of fruit. Page References Bailey 651, Fernald 994, Gleason & Cronquist 343, Holmgren 323, Magee & Ahles 726, Seymour 382. See reference section for full citations.


SIMILAR SPECIES

Vitis spp. (Grapes)
Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Sieb. & Zucc.) Planch (Boston ivy)


REPRODUCTIVE/DISPERSAL MECHANISMS

The seeds of Ampelopsis brevipedunculata are bird dispersed, though there has been some indication of water acting as a secondary method of dispersal.


DISTRIBUTION

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is native to Japan and North China. Its current range in the U. S. is from New Hampshire to Georgia and west to Wisconsin. In New England it is present in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.


HISTORY OF INTRODUCTION IN NEW ENGLAND

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata was introduced into cultivation in 1870 on the grounds of eastern estates to be used as a bedding and screening plant. The variety 'Elegans' was introduced before 1847. Thus, it was most likely introduced into New England by direct planting, or possibly through bird dispersal.


HABITATS IN NEW ENGLAND

Abandoned Field,Early Successional Forest,Edge,Pasture,Planted Forest,Railroad Right-of-Way,Roadside,Utility Right-of-Way,Vacant Lot,Yard or Garden

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata prefers moist soils and partial sun. It grows well along stream banks and thickets. It can also be found along highway shoulders, railroad beds, shorelines, in fields, hedges or at the edges of forests.


THREATS

Because it is a vine, Ampelopsis brevipedunculata has the ability to grow up and smother native vegetation. The extra weight of this vine on the underlying plant makes it more susceptible to wind and ice damage. Ampelopsis brevipedunculata grows rapidly and is difficult to control. The fruit can float, so water can disperse these plants long distances. The seeds are known to have a high germination rate, aiding the establishment of this plant.


MANAGEMENT LINKS

Plant Conservation Alliance
Fact sheet including management information

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation
Fact sheet including control information


DOCUMENTATION NEEDS

Documentation required: A specific photograph or mounted snippet of the leaves with fruits.
Best time for documentation: Fall.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation
General information including control [PDF]

University of Connecticut Plant Database
Description, general information and photographs

North Carolina State University, Consumer Horticulture
Fact sheet including a photograph

The PLANTS Database
General information and a map

Integrated Taxonomic Information System
Taxonomic information


REFERENCES

Antenen, S.A. 1996. Ampelopsis brevipedunculata. p.91. In Randall, J.M. and J. Marinelli. [eds.].  Invasive Plants: Weeds of the Global Garden. Brooklyn Botanic Garden Inc., New York.

Bailey, L. H.  1949.  Manual of Cultivated Plants.  Macmillan, New York.

Dirr, M.A. 1983. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Stipes Publishing Company, Champaign, Illinois.

Fernald, M.L.  1950.  Gray's Manual of Botany 8th edition.  American Book Company, New York.

Gleason, H.A. and A.C. Cronquist.  1991.  Manual of Vascular Plants of the Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. 2nd ed.  New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York.

Holmgren, N.H. 1998. Illustrated Companion to Gleason and Cronquist's Manual.  New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York.

Magee, D.W and H.E. Ahles. 1999.  Flora of the Northeast. University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst.

Robertson, D. J., M.C. Robertson and T. Tague.  1994.  Colonization dynamics of four exotic plants in a Northern Piedmont Natural Area.  Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 121(2):107-118.

Seymour, F.C. 1969. The Flora of New England. Charles E. Tuttle Company, Inc., Tokyo, Japan.

USDA, NRCS.  2001.  The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1. (http://plants.usda.gov).  National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.